Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Since Google launched Adwords in 2000, its advertising customers have sought the elusive keywords whose special properties can drive the most traffic to their Web sites. But according to Charles L. Mauro, founder and CEO of technology research company MauroNewMedia, without carefully crafted Web site architecture and design, even the savviest keywords won’t do the trick.

Mauro’s company, through an extensive longitudinal research project conducted over a two-year period, strived to answer one question: Does Web site design impact customer acquisition rates when users link to it via Adwords references? The firm discovered that when carefully vetted keywords were aligned with customized Web site design features, the number of unique page views, the time spent on site and the frequency of repeat visits were substantially increased.

The results were achieved by designing and testing a Web site containing these features:

  • a customized landing page for each critical keyword flowing from Adwords.
  • prominent replication of key search terms used in the user’s initial query.
  • presentation of a compelling image and value proposition tied to keyword content.

“What we learned was so compelling that we redesigned our own Web site to include the features dictated by the data,” said Mauro. “The secret is not simply identifying the most effective keywords, it’s customizing the Web site to accommodate its visitors.”

To demonstrate these findings in a live site, MauroNewMedia has created a beta site based on the research by using search terms relevant to their business. To explore these concepts further select the link below which will take you to a research page where you can experience exactly what individuals selecting the 3 MauroNewMedia key Adwords ads would see. The initial testing of the beta site has revealed significantly improved core metrics and, more importantly, a higher frequency of cross-sell across major service categories.

Link to research page and sample Google Adwords ads for the new site: http://www.mauronewmedia.com/research-updates.php

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Students spellbound by the game of SCRABBLE competed in the 2008 National School SCRABBLE Championship held this weekend in Providence at the Rhode Island Convention Center. After six rounds and countless strategic plays, returning champion Matt Silver, 14, of Westport, Conn. and his teammate Logan Rosen defeated Joey Krafchick, 13, of Roswell, Ga. and his teammate Dorian Hill, 13 of Tucker, Ga. in the Championship round today, claiming the title and a $5,000 grand prize. It’s a fitting tribute to a game that’s celebrating its 60th anniversary this year.

Logan Rosen and Matt Silver, Westport SCRABBLE Club.“The National School SCRABBLE Championship brings students from all across the country together for the love of the game,” said John D. Williams, Jr., executive director, National SCRABBLE Association. “These kids enjoy playing SCRABBLE because it is both challenging and fun.”

During the Championship, 100 teams of students in grades five-to-eight from 23 states competed in six rounds of play on Friday and Saturday leading to the final match-up. The grand prize winners received a $5,000 cash prize. The second-place team was awarded $2,000 and the third place team walked away with $1,000. Once again, ESPN will telecast the Championship as kids head back to school in August 2008.

Among those competing in the National School SCRABBLE Championship were two teams from the Arizona Cactus-Pine Council Girl Scouts and two students from the Philadelphia ASAP Program, an organization providing after-school programs for kids of all ages.

More than one million students have played SCRABBLE in approximately 20,000 schools nationwide. This year, the National SCRABBLE Association and the Girl Scouts of the USA announced the availability of the first ever SCRABBLE game patch, “Words Rock.” There are currently 27 Girl Scout SCRABBLE clubs representing 19 states, and two teams participated in the National School SCRABBLE Championship.

A family favorite since 1948, the board game is celebrating its Diamond Anniversary and is found in one out of every three homes in America, according to Hasbro, makers of the game in the United States and Canada. SCRABBLE is unique because it is a game of continuous winning moments. Unlike other games where players wait until the end of the game to find a winner, SCRABBLE provides a great sense of accomplishment throughout the entire process. Any time participants look at their tiles to find a word, they are immediately rewarded, which is why kids love to play the game.

“All of the participants demonstrated a tremendous amount of passion, enthusiasm and sportsmanship which make the Championship a fun event for everyone involved,” said Jay Bruns, director of marketing for SCRABBLE, Hasbro Games. “This program is a testament to the unifying power that a fun game like SCRABBLE can have on people of all ages.”

The National School SCRABBLE Championship is underwritten by Hasbro. For more information about the SCRABBLE game or other tournaments and clubs around the country, visit http://www.scrabbleassociation.com.

About Hasbro

Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is a worldwide leader in children’s and family leisure time entertainment products and services, including the design, manufacture and marketing of games and toys ranging from traditional to high-tech. Both internationally and in the U.S., its PLAYSKOOL, TONKA, MILTON BRADLEY, PARKER BROTHERS, TIGER and WIZARDS OF THE COAST brands and products provide the highest quality and most recognizable play experiences in the world. SCRABBLE, the distinctive game board and letter tiles and all associated logos are trademarks of Hasbro in the United States and Canada and are used with permission.

Read Full Post »

MySpace, the world’s most popular social network, alongside Yahoo!, eBay, Photobucket, and Twitter, today announced the launch of the MySpace ‘Data Availability’ initiative, a ground-breaking offering to empower the global MySpace community to share their public profile data to websites of their choice throughout the Internet. Today’s announcement throws open the doors to traditionally closed networks by putting users in the driver’s seat of their data and Web identity. The launch of the Data Availability initiative marks the first time that a social Website has enabled its community to dynamically share public profile information with other sites.

MySpace Data Availability on Twitter.

“The walls around the garden are coming down-the implementation of Data Availability injects a new layer of social activity and creates a more dynamic Internet,” said Chris DeWolfe, CEO and co-founder of MySpace. “We, alongside our Data Availability launch partners, are pioneering a new way for the global community to integrate their social experiences Web-wide.”

Data Availability – User Interface

Data Availability pioneers a new way for users to dynamically share their user generated content and data with websites of their choosing. The Data Availability initiative is founded first and foremost on the simple and comprehensive user control of their own content and data – users will have control over what information they share and who they share it with.

Additionally, rather than updating information across the Web (eg. default photo, favorite movies or music) for each site where a user spends time, now a user can update their profile in one place and dynamically share that information with the other sites they care about. MySpace will be rolling out a centralized location within the site that allows users to manage how their content and data is made available to third party sites they have chosen to engage with.

Inside this opt-in framework, they will be offered the opportunity to share their MySpace profiles with the site they are visiting. MySpace, and its landmark launch partners, will be allowing users to dynamically share the content and data of their choosing including: (1) Publicly available basic profile information, (2) MySpace photos, (3) MySpaceTV videos, and (4) friend networks. Integration of the Data Availability project will roll to MySpace users and participating Websites in the coming weeks.

“The launch of Data Availability is an unprecedented move to further socialize the Web and empower users to control their online content and data,” said Amit Kapur, Chief Operating Officer, MySpace. “We are thrilled to begin this initiative with a world class suite of landmark partners and invite websites around the world to participate.”

Partner Website Functionality

Data Availability is about enriching existing Internet destinations with social functionality and valuable pre-existing user generated content and data.  By empowering users with the ability to dynamically share, those destinations will create deeper levels of social engagement and new functionality throughout their site. As the online home to 117 million users worldwide, this groundbreaking initiative enables the larger Web to leverage the highly engaged and passionate MySpace global community.

To ease implementation for participating sites, the MySpace Data Availability initiative uses OAUTH and Restful APIs as its core technology underpinnings. MySpace is using open standards in an effort to embrace the open source community and allow the implementation to be as non-proprietary as possible. Today’s announcement is the first step of MySpace’s larger data portability initiatives coming down the pipeline. MySpace is officially joining the Data Portability Project demonstrating our continued commitment to openness and open standards.

Data Availability on Yahoo!

MySpace’s Data Availability complements Yahoo!’s recently announced Yahoo! Open Strategy (Y!OS), a company-wide initiative to open Yahoo! to application developers, unlock the rich social connections across the Yahoo! network, and enable users to customize and make more personally relevant their experiences of Yahoo! and other Internet services.

On Yahoo!, the Data Availability initiative may appear to users in a variety of ways.  For example, users that have chosen to share their MySpace content and data with Yahoo! Instant Messenger might find their MySpace default photo, interests, and favorite music displayed to their Messenger contacts directly in the IM client.  Additionally, MySpace users will be able to choose to display their data within Yahoo!’s universal profile or leverage it in Yahoo! Mail’s smarter inbox, once those upcoming releases are deployed.

“Yahoo! believes in an open Internet that gives users the flexibility to make their Web experiences as relevant, social and personalized as they can.  As a longtime collaborator with MySpace on a variety of projects, including the OpenSocial Foundation, we’re thrilled to support this new initiative,” said Ash Patel, Executive Vice President, Platforms, at Yahoo!.  “The Yahoo! Open Strategy and MySpace Data Availability are a giant leap towards a more social and open Internet.”

Data Availability on eBay

Through the MySpace Data Availability implementation, eBay profiles can be easily enhanced with MySpace bios, interests, pictures, and videos. In a socially driven marketplace, this will yield a deeper connection between individuals. When browsing or transacting on eBay, the availability of external social information can help users make good decisions quickly about whom they can do business with, and perhaps even make a new friend.

“The MySpace Data Availabilityinitiative will further enrich eBay profiles and create a more elaborate social experience for buyers and sellers worldwide,” said Matt Ackley, VP of Internet Marketing of eBay.  “As the world’s largest social commerce site, eBay is dedicated to creating a social context and personality for the people with whom you transact.”

Data Availability on Photobucket

MySpace’s Data Availability initiative will allow Photobucket users to enjoy a more seamless photo experience with their MySpace profile.  Photobucket users will be able to have a single view of their photos across multiple services, as well as opt-in to displaying their MySpace profile data in their Photobucket albums.  Users will also be able to leverage their existing connections on MySpace to share their content on Photobucket more easily, without having to re-establish connections and friend lists.

“MySpace users invest a huge amount of time populating their profile and personal interest data.  With the large overlap in users, the Data Availability initiative will allow Photobucket to utilize this profile data to enhance its own products,” said Alex Welch, President of Photobucket.  “The combination of the Data Availability initiative and the recently announced Photobucket Open-API provides new opportunities to create a more open web”

Data Availability on Twitter

Twitter profiles at present are primarily focused on current updates and are relatively sparse on user information. The MySpace Data Availability initiative enriches the current Twitter profile by empowering users to incorporate their MySpace profile content and data points previously not included in the Twitter product suite.  Once the implementation is complete, a user will be able to bring in their MySpace content and data including their bio, blogs, and photos, ultimately making the Twitter site a more enriching site with content previously unavailable in its interface.

“Finding friends to follow is central to Twitter’s value as a real-time communication utility.” Says Biz Stone, Co-founder, Twitter. “This project enhances discovery and connectivity making Twitter more relevant and useful-we’re very excited.”

Stay Tuned for more updates, later today. Subscribe

Read Full Post »

The HHS Office of HIV/AIDS Policy announced today that the Web site AIDS.gov, a gateway to all federal domestic HIV /AIDS information and resources, now has an innovative look and feel that incorporates a blog, podcasts, and other new media tools.

AIDS.gov Home Page MessageThe blog, one of AIDS.gov’s latest features, focuses on using new media – interactive forms of communication based on the Internet – in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The blog addresses topics such as podcasts, social networks (e.g. MySpace and Facebook), mobile phone text messaging, and Web site usability and accessibility.

HHS, which hosts AIDS.gov, developed the site with input from public health experts, representatives of HIV/AIDS service organizations, federal employees, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the general public. AIDS.gov was first launched on Dec. 1, 2006, which is World AIDS Day.

“As we approach the 27th year of this epidemic, new media tools are an effective and interactive way to deliver information to and engage with AIDS service providers, health departments, federal partners, community partners, and the general public,” said Miguel Gomez, director of AIDS.gov.

Visitors to AIDS.gov can listen to and view a monthly podcast series, Conversations on AIDS.gov, directly on the site, as well as download episodes. Each episode features a brief interview with a government official about topics impacting the lives of people living with, or at risk for, HIV/AIDS. The address is http://www.aids.gov/podcast/aids_podcast.html.

One of AIDS.gov’s other added features is that visitors can subscribe to an RSS feed to receive updates when new information is added to thesite. This enables subscribers to have information delivered to them, instead of having to constantly check the site for it.

AIDS.gov’s new design helps visitors navigate through a wealth of HIV/AIDS resources. The site includes the latest HIV/AIDS news, basic HIV/AIDS information, information on prevention, education, treatment, and care resources.

Many HHS agencies collaborate to make AIDS.gov a user-friendly, accessible, and helpful source of information. Non-HHS partners include the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and the State Department’s Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator.”

AIDS.gov is a key source for federal domestic HIV/AIDS information. The site’s new look and feel, and improved navigation, enhances our ability to reach the country with critical HIV prevention, testing, treatment, and research messages and resources,” said Christopher H. Bates, acting director of HHS’ Office of HIV/AIDS Policy. To learn more, visit: http://www.AIDS.gov.

Read Full Post »

Publishers of many major children’s Web sites should do a better job disclosing sales and advertising information to parents, especially as more kids at younger ages go online to play and meet friends, says a study released today by Consumer Reports WebWatch and the Mediatech Foundation of Flemington, N.J.

httpFor the study, parents in 10 families used video cameras to keep journals, providing insights into the way children use sites such as Club Penguin, Webkinz, Nick Jr., Barbie.com and others. Footage from those journals, which can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/cwwkids, illustrates how young children respond to advertising and marketing tactics online.

The study, “Like Taking Candy from a Baby: How Young Children Interact with Online Environments,” used ethnographic methods and focused on young children, ages 2 1/2 to 8. It can be found in its entirety online at: http://www.consumerwebwatch.org/pdfs/kidsonline.pdf

Some key findings:

  • Children as young as 2 1/2 years of age are able to go online.
  • The most popular young children’s sites are moderately to heavily commercialized. When rated by our test parents on a scale from 1 (not commercialized) to 5 (extremely commercialized), the 21 sites considered in this study scored a mean rating of 3.47.
  • Web sites frequently tantalize children, presenting enticing options and even threats that their online creations will become inaccessible unless a purchase is made. Some sites show attractive options that invite a click, but lead to a registration form instead. Some sell a child’s prior experience – a room they’ve built for a virtual pet, for instance – back to them, using statements such as, “If you cancel your membership, then your belongings will go into storage and will be automatically retrieved when you re-subscribe.”
  • Most sites we observed promote the idea of consumerism. The most common technique uses a reward-for-work basis, awarding “points, coins or dollars” for success and achievement that can then be used to “buy” items such as clothing, makeup, big-screen TVs or other accessories for virtual pets or avatars.
  • The games we observed vary widely in quality, in educational value, and in their developmental match with children’s abilities. Such mismatches often result in frequent cries for help.

How Young Children Interact with Online Environments.“There’s no doubt young children love to go online, and we observed examples of wholesome, good quality, Web-delivered content,” said Warren Buckleitner, the study’s author. “But after watching ten hours of typical online play, we were shocked at the extent of manipulative behavior. This study shows that no one – neither parents nor publishers – really knows what is going on when children start up a browser. Ideally, the sites kids encounter should be designed by people with degrees in child development instead of MBAs.

“There’s nothing more painful than watching a young child cry,” Buckleitner said. “But unfortunately, that’s the end result for too many children who are spending time with ‘state-of the-art’ children’s online content.”

The study makes these and other recommendations for parents:

  • Keep an eye on the screen. Set up the home computer in a central location so you can see what your child is doing. Lend a hand or suggest an activity that matches your child’s interests or abilities and pay attention to the directions his or her activities take.
  • How Young Children Interact with Online Environments.Be suspicious of “free” offers. As in the real world, free lunches are rare, and this is a concept children can’t understand. Don’t expect young children (and many adults) to understand the well-worn caution: “If something looks too good to be true, it probably is.”
  • Read before you click. Before you or your children click on the “I agree” button, scour terms-of-use agreements and privacy policies to make sure you aren’t agreeing to share information you don’t want known. At worst, publishers make such disclosures inconvenient to read and awkward, so you are tempted to click an agreement and move on. Those emotions can be amplified when you have an anxious toddler pressing you. Also, don’t download software before verifying it won’t alter your computer’s settings.

“We believe parents need a more complete picture of the Web sites where their young children are spending an increasing amount of time,” said Beau Brendler, director of Consumer Reports WebWatch. “One test family spent $1,316 in a year on stuffed animals on a single site. Some sites play for profit on a child’s emotions to the degree we saw begging, tantrums and even tears in the videos.”

The study will be available at the Joan Ganz Cooney Center’s inaugural symposium, “Logging Into the Playground: How Digital Media Are Shaping Children’s Learning” on Friday, May 9, in New York City. Details at http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/events/index.html

Methodology

This study used ethnographic methodology and cannot be considered representative of any whole population. A total of 15 children participated in the study from ten families, all residing in Hunterdon County, New Jersey – six girls and nine boys, ranging in age from 2 years 9 months, to 8 years 3 months, with the mean age just under 5 1/2 years (5.36 years). All families had high-speed Internet access. Nine used Windows operating systems, one used Macintosh.

The study makes recommendations for Web publishers of children’s sites, based in part on WebWatch’s guidelines for Web site credibility, first published in 2002.

About Consumer Reports WebWatch

Consumer Reports WebWatch is the Internet integrity division of Consumers Union, the non-profit publisher of Consumer Reports Magazine, the Consumer Reports on Health and Money Adviser newsletters, and a variety of sites advocating consumer rights in the marketplace. We research and investigate Web sites on behalf of consumers, and we advocate for consumer-focused Internet policy and governance. Consumer Reports WebWatch accepts no advertising. Consumer Reports WebWatch is a member of the W3C consortium for developing Internet standards; the Internet Society, a grass-roots group focused on Internet policy; and is an at-large structure (ALS) in the user community of ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigning Names and Numbers. WebWatch also serves as an unpaid special adviser to StopBadware.org, a “Neighborhood Watch” initiative led by Harvard University’s Berkman Center and the Oxford Internet Institute devoted to helping Internet users avoid downloading malicious spyware, adware and malware programs. With the Center for Media and Democracy, WebWatch publishes Full Frontal Scrutiny (http://www.frontgroups.org), dedicated to exposing the activities of front groups in modern media and culture. For further information about Consumer Reports WebWatch, including staff biographies, visit ConsumerWebwatch.org

About Mediatech Foundation

Mediatech Foundation is a non¬profit public community technology center based in Flemington, N.J. Warren Buckleitner, PhD., an adviser to Consumer Reports WebWatch and founder of the Mediatech Foundation, wrote this report. Buckleitner is editor of Children’s Technology Review, a periodical covering children’s interactive media. A former teacher of preschool children and 2nd-, 4th- and 6th- graders, Buckleitner has been studying the design of interactive learning products since 1982. He holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, a master’s degree in human development and a doctorate in educational psychology learning, culture and technology from Michigan State University. Study sites were screened by Debbie O’Grady, a reviewer for Children’s Technology Review. Buckleitner and Brendler interpreted video footage.

Read Full Post »

Microsoft Research has recognized five innovative, young faculty members from across the nation to join the ranks of Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellows. This program now encompasses 20 academic researchers whose exceptional talent for research and thought leadership make them standouts in their fields. The selected professors are exploring breakthrough, high-impact research that has the potential to help solve some of today’s most challenging societal problems.

“We want to make it easier for early-career faculty to take risks in their research,” said Sailesh Chutani, senior director of Microsoft External Research. “We believe our New Faculty Fellows program provides young professors with the means to pursue research with the potential to make a profound impact.”

About 100 young faculty members from the United States and Canada were nominated for the 2008 awards. The five 2008 New Faculty Fellows are as follows:

Grauman’s work is in the area of inferring object properties such as shape or pose from electronic images, which has major implications for data mining and search.Kristen Grauman, University of Texas at Austin. Grauman’s research focuses on designing the algorithms and learning processes that will allow computers to understand and organize visual information. In particular, she is interested in tackling the major scalability issues that surround visual recognition and search. The goal is to make it possible to efficiently index large volumes of visual data (images or videos) based on their content – a functionality that has the potential to greatly benefit a variety of users, from consumers to scientists and engineers.

Hohenberger has done some groundbreaking work in the area of cryptography, including electronic transactions, and verifying the authenticity of incoming messages and encrypting outgoing ones in energy, data and time constrained applications.Susan Hohenberger, Johns Hopkins University. Hohenberger focuses on cryptography, the art of securely communicating. She is interested in designing secure solutions for pervasive settings, where devices everywhere are constantly talking to their environments, which may require the ability to quickly process a large number of incoming messages. Her research includes an emphasis on developing privacy-friendly technologies, such as anonymous communication and electronic cash.

Kleinberg is developing algorithms and theory to address complex interactions in a networked environment. His work has implications for the fields of online learning, routing and information transmission in networks.Robert Kleinberg, Cornell University. Kleinberg studies the theory of algorithm design under informational limitations. This means that he looks at practical questions in computer science – such as how to design more robust adaptive systems for Web search, network routing, online auctions and product recommendations – and address these questions using mathematically rigorous techniques that build on ideas from learning theory, game theory and information theory.

Phil Levis is working on advanced operating systems for sensor networks, which has tremendous implications for environmental science and other fields.Philip Levis, Stanford University. Levis researches software and networking for tiny, low-power, wireless sensors. He focuses on making these networks of sensors easier to deploy and maintain by researching ultrasimple algorithms that use robust local rules to achieve desirable global behaviors. Software he develops is used by hundreds of research groups worldwide and runs on millions of nodes.

Russ Tedrake has taken a whole new view on the control of robots, incorporating the physics of natural motion into the design of his controls.Russell Tedrake, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Tedrake focuses on computational and machine-learning approaches to control system design for robots that walk, run, swim and fly more like real animals. He believes that to succeed, both the mechanical design of the robots and the algorithms for controller design must exploit the natural, nonlinear dynamics of locomotion. In the next few years, he aims to build bipedal robots that can walk and jump across piles of rocks, and develop robotic birds with flapping wings that can gracefully land on a perch.

“I’m delighted and honored to be selected for the Microsoft fellowship, and to be included among the group of past and present winners whom I deeply admire,” said Robert Kleinberg, assistant professor in the department of computer science at Cornell University. “The most important resource that my research requires is interaction with gifted colleagues, and the fellowship funds give me a wide range of options, such as supporting graduate students and postdocs, and organizing symposia. I’m grateful to Microsoft Research for this extremely generous gift and for the hugely positive influence they’ve had on my growth as a researcher over the years.”

The Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship program was created in 2005 to honor first-, second- and third-year university professors who demonstrate exceptional talent for unique research and thought leadership in computer science and related fields. These awards provide funds to encourage creative freedom and collaboration opportunities among tomorrow’s most promising new professors.

The Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship program provides $1 million in funding each year. Each chosen fellow receives $200,000 to be used at his or her discretion. Additional resources include software, invitations to academic and professional conferences, and the opportunity to engage firsthand with leading researchers from Microsoft Research. As an unrestricted gift, the fellows have the freedom to plan their research agenda, hire grad students, build labs and purchase equipment.

According to the eligibility criteria, only one nominee per university may be entered into the program’s rigorous, multitier selection process, which culminated this year with 11 finalists being interviewed face to face by a distinguished panel of Microsoft Research executives and researchers, as well as faculty members from some of the nation’s leading universities. From the 11 finalists, five were chosen as the 2008 Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellows.

“Microsoft is committed to the New Faculty Fellows program with its potential to create exciting opportunities for the computer science researchers, educators and leaders of tomorrow,” Chutani said. “For the pipeline of computer science and engineering students to increase, there also needs to be a pipeline of dynamic faculty like these to inspire and lead them.”

These awards are part of Microsoft Research’s broader efforts aimed at funding innovative academic research that will significantly extend the state of the art in computing and ensure a rich future for computing through recognition and support of the next generation of computer science leaders.

About Microsoft Research

Founded in 1991, Microsoft Research is dedicated to conducting both basic and applied research in computer science and software engineering. Its goals are to enhance the user experience on computing devices, reduce the cost of writing and maintaining software, and invent novel computing technologies. Researchers focus on more than 55 areas of computing and collaborate with leading academic, government and industry researchers to advance the state of the art in such areas as graphics, speech recognition, user-interface research, natural language processing, programming tools and methodologies, operating systems and networking, and the mathematical sciences. Microsoft Research currently employs more than 800 people in six labs located in Redmond, Wash.; Cambridge, Mass.; Silicon Valley, Calif.; Cambridge, England; Beijing, China; and Bangalore, India. Microsoft Research collaborates openly with colleges and universities worldwide to enhance the teaching and learning experience, inspire technological innovation, and broadly advance the field of computer science. More information can be found at http://www.research.microsoft.com.

Read Full Post »

Microsoft Management Summit 2008 – Novell announced it is working with Microsoft Corp. to develop advanced Linux* management solutions that will allow customers to simplify the management of mixed IT environments. Building on their existing technical collaboration agreement, Microsoft and Novell will work with industry standards and open source components to standardize management capabilities. The joint effort, which leverages Novell’s market-leading expertise in open source Linux management, is designed to maximize the value of a customer’s IT infrastructure investment.

“Customers today are looking for solutions that enable them to manage heterogeneous IT environments, and Microsoft is pleased to extend our System Center suite to offer management for Linux distributions, like SUSE Linux Enterprise,” said Brad Anderson, general manager of the Management and Services Division at Microsoft. “Microsoft is both using and intending to contribute enhancements to the OpenPegasus Project’s Common Information Model Object Manager (CIMOM) and delivering to the open source community interoperable providers, which collect management data and make it accessible to management services.”

As part of the collaboration, Novell, with its expertise in Linux system management, will work with Microsoft to enhance the System Center Operations Manager 2007 Cross Platform Extensions, which Microsoft announced today at the Microsoft Management Summit 2008. This extension of Microsoft System Center Operations Manager utilizes industry standards such as WS-Management and open source software to deliver Linux and UNIX* management. Leveraging its collaboration with Microsoft, industry standards and open source software, Novell intends to develop an advanced Linux management pack for System Center Operations Manager 2007. In addition, Novell plans to utilize the open source interoperable providers to extend the Linux management capabilities of its Novell(R) ZENworks(R) systems management products. These management solutions will allow SUSE(R) Linux Enterprise Server to be the best-managed Linux distribution.

“Novell has previously outlined in its Systems and Resource Management blueprint that it intends to support in its ZENworks solutions the use of open source and open standards to simplify and standardize systems management.” said Joe Wagner, senior vice president and general manager for Novell Systems and Resource Management. “By working together to extend Linux management for System Center Operations Manager, Microsoft and Novell are building on this standards-based, open source foundation to provide superior management for mixed IT environments. The collaboration will give customers flexibility with a unique combination of heterogeneous IT management software.”

More information about the Microsoft and Novell collaboration can be found at http://www.moreinterop.com. For more information on systems and resource management from Novell, visit http://www.novell.com/zenworks.

About Novell

Novell, Inc. (Nasdaq: NOVL) delivers the best engineered, most interoperable Linux platform and a portfolio of integrated IT management software that helps customers around the world reduce cost, complexity and risk. With our infrastructure software and ecosystem of partnerships, Novell harmoniously integrates mixed IT environments, allowing people and technology to work as one. For more information, visit http://www.novell.com.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »